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National Bobcat Rescue
& Research
 A subsidiary of the Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch
 A 501c non-profit Oganization

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Bobcat Frankie

The Bob-Blog

 

Source: The Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch official blog » bobcat rescue
Author: karidawn
12/18/2012

 

 

Happy Holidays Wildlife Friends!

   Now, Don’t fall over in shock, but this is Val.  As most of you know, Dawn started our Facebook page years ago, and thankfully, Kari picked up where she left off and expanded our page to include a blog. As much as I would love to be entrenched in social media, I have neither the time, nor the know-how.  However, I have been overwhelmed by the Christmas Spirit this year and wanted to make a special effort to take the time to give you the updates you have been asking for!  And, because the Christmas spirit has grabbed a hold of me, I am going to take it a step further and give you a gift!  From now until the end of the month, I am going to give you a short bio on ALL of the cats that are currently in care at the center!  And, I would like to ask all of you to add your stories, comments and experiences, if you have any, with each of the cats or at the ranch, as they are discussed.  There is a reason for this. 

 

NBRR & NBRR have grown in leaps and bounds.  Because most of our friends are not local, most have no idea what is going on out here.  We want you to know, and to SHARE with others, the GREAT work we are doing.  We also want to give you updates on the new outreach and policies we have set in place.  First, and most important, NBRR decided, two years ago, to branch out from native wildlife and begin accepting confiscated or unwanted (turned over) imprinted Bobcats.  We quickly became the largest bobcat rescue in the United States.  We are now proud to announce that we have been asked to be the first bobcat rescue to be utilized by the AZA and to be listed in their studbook!   The AZA studbook is where AZA accredited Zoos and Aquariums turn to find breeders to supply their facilities with replacement animals.  This is VERY exciting because, due to our rapidly growing national reputation, they contacted us!  We will now be able to accept, train, and supply imprinted bobcats that might otherwise be euthanized due to lack of space in exotic feline rescues.  Of course, many of these cats come to us with severe behavioral problems.  Our behavior specialists are some of the finest in the country!  Special Kudos to Kari and Deborah for their exceptional work and dedication to these very special cats!

 

     So, where to start?  My goodness! Alphabetically, I presume, would make the most sense.  Since we began this new program, cats have poured in, so you will get to hear stories about bobcats that you have never been introduced to before! And, because we have more cats than we have days left in the month, we will have to double up on most days and give you one in the morning and one in the evening! Yes, We’re THAT busy! Unfortunately, that means a HUGE burden on our dwindling funds!

 

Since we know that you didn’t know, we are hoping that you will share these stories with everyone in hopes that we find enough donations to pull us through another (exceptionally busy!) winter.

 

We hope that if you read a story that you enjoy, or that touches your heart, that you will cross-post it so that we can increase our friend base and hopefully find some corporate and/or private sponsors that we still so desperately need. 

 

It is important to note that our first love continues to be the thousands of native wild animals, including wild bobcats, who come to us for help each year. 

 

The imprinted cats are entrusted to our care and are donated by us to other non-profit educational facilities.  Our work here is critically important to the future understanding of the increasing population of urban bobcats and we continue to operate on a completely volunteer staff.  We cannot do this alone.  Please remember these beautiful animals during this holiday season and throughout the year because the next well adjusted and happy bobcat you see in a zoo throughout the United States may be from The National Bobcat Rescue and Research Center.

    God Bless you all and Happiest of holidays from all of us at Crosstimbers!

 

A preface to our introductions.  Bobcats come and bobcats go around here.  Some stay for a few weeks, some stay for years.  Much depends of their ability to be released back to the wild, whether they have medical or behavioral problems, whether those problems are temporary or permanent, and how old they are when they arrive.  Each cat is given an identifying name.  We start alphabetically each year.  When we reach “Z”, we begin again.  Any bobkitten brought to us who has not already been imprinted is slated to be returned to the wild after it has reached one year of age; adults and juveniles who are not imprinted must also be at least one year old before they are released back to the wild. 

 

The reason for this is because in the wild, they will stay with their mother until they’re at least 10 months old and, literally remain kittens, emotionally, until they are at least one year old. In an urban environment, they will stay with their families even longer, sometimes for life!  Should we try to release them prior to one year old, they do not thrive and often end up being returned to us by some unsuspecting stranger who found a starving bobcat on his property.  Though the years, we have leaned to avoid this by making SURE that our cats are emotionally ready to be out on their own. 

 

We strive to ensure success as a “rewilded” animal for every creature that comes through our doors. But most, especially our beloved bobcats, are incredibly intelligent; and we must diligently strive to ensure that we do not damage their wild potential by allowing an overabundance of human interaction in their space.

 

     Our work has led us to discover, so far, seven different personality types in bobcats.  Each is as distinguishable as day and night.  Some personality types are more easily imprinted than others.  It is with those that we must be the most careful.  Others want nothing more than to be wild from the day they arrive to the day we watch them run across an open pasture to live their wild lives. There is nothing more gratifying than to release a cat back to the wild, yet, many can never go back.  Why? 

 

To answer this question, we must revisit the issue of the level of intelligence that these incredible cats posses.  These cats could easily survive in the wild, yet, they are so smart, that one they have become imprinted, they recognize where food comes from.  Many of them seek affection.  When an imprinted cat is released, it will seek out humans and approach them.  This ends up badly in 99% of these cases.  They are often shot or trapped and euthanized because they are “acting strangely”.  A few of them make it to us.  Generally, they are the ones who have collars on and have escaped from a home.  The percentage rate of an imprinted cat, as best we can figure, is only about 5%, and that is ONLY if the cat is release onto a private protected property where there are no hunters or humans to ruin their chances. Therefore, with the imprinted cats, we work closely with them to be very sure that they will be happy in a facility where they can be a liaison for their wild brothers and sisters.  As we introduce you to our current cats in care, we want you to clearly understand that our main goal is to return them to the wild, and that when that is not possible, the next best thing is to ensure a happy life with handlers who will give each cat what it needs to live a long and happy life with people who love, respect and care about these beautiful animals.  We are always happy to answer questions from anyone, so please, if you have any, let us know.  We always want the best for our charges, and when the obvious best is not attainable, then we seek the best available.  We hope you will enjoy reading about our work and support us in any way you can!

 

 

 

Angel~Face (and XYZ)

 

Each year, we struggle with naming certain alphabet letters – and this year is NO different.  We will start out our alphabetical stories with “Angel-Face” who was named after she arrived with her two brothers and one sister.  Angel-Face was EASY to name.  As often happens, she became highly stressed when she first arrived, quit eating, and became very sick.  She lost a lot of weight, so we had to pull her away from her family to get her back on her feet.  While she was separated, we named her Angel-face because she was SO curious about everything we did.  She would hide in her cat box, peek over the edge and would get the sweetest look on her face when we confused her by doing our “Human things”.  We ultimately cave her a cat box full of blankies that she could hide in while sneaking a peek at our antics.  She remained separated for about three weeks while she gained weight and her strength back.  Her brothers and sister were dubbed “X, Y & Z”.  They are STILL named X, Y & Z!  They are strong and sassy!  They talk and play constantly, but the MINUTE they see a human, they all run for cover into the nearest crate or box.   We are hoping for your help!  Will you all PLEASE help us name these other kitties?  Please post your ideas below. Human baby names have all already been used, so we want to ask you to make up unique names, for example, last year’s X, Y & Z were named Xylan, Yoda, & Zachia.  So be creative!  We need your help!

   Angel-face and her siblings are expected to be released into the wild in late summer next year.  They are as wild as they come!  They are all four living together again and are getting ready to be moved outside to the wild barn.  Out kittens stay inside until they reach about 5 months of age.  Until then, we must keep a VERY close eye on them because they can become very sick VERY fast. The stress of capture, of living without their mothers, of being in unnatural conditions, and of eating unfamiliar diets can cause a multitude of problems. The little ones are always a challenge, so we keep a very close eye on them

    These little ones arrived when they were only 5 weeks old.  I am afraid that we do not have many pictures of them as we wanted them to stay wild and therefore did not/do not approach them very often.  I took this picture the other day while hiding behind the couch.  You can see that they are all very bonded and will, likely, stay together long after they are released.

                       

 Their mother was trapped and relocated before anyone realized that she had babies.  At about 4 weeks of age, and barely walking, the little ones started peeking out of their den, one at a time, looking for their mommy.  They were hungry and frightened.  They were caught and brought to us over a period of several days.  All are finally doing really well.  There really isn’t much more to say about these guys except that they are all doing as expected and staying on track to be released, growing like weeds and staying wild!  This is our only large litter, so will be the only time you will get an update on multiple cats at one time. Don’t forget to help us name X,Y & Z!


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